Sunday, 31 July 2011

The Quran and Hadith on Ramadan

The Quran and Hadith on Ramadan

THE QURAN ON FASTING
"O you who believe! Fasting is prescribed for you as it was prescribed for those before you, that you may become Al-Muttaqun (the pious).
(Fasting) for a fixed number of days, but if any of you is ill or on a journey, the same number (should be made up) from other days. And as for those who can fast with difficulty, (i.e. an old man, etc.), they have (a choice either to fast or) to feed a poor person (for every day). But whoever does good of his own accord, it is better for him. And that you fast, it is better for you if only you know." (2:183-84)
"The month of Ramadan in which was revealed the Quran, a guidance for mankind and clear proofs for the guidance and the criterion (between right and wrong). So whoever of you sights (the crescent on the first night of) the month (of Ramadan), he must fast that month, and whoever is ill or on a journey, the same number (of days which one did not fast must be made up) from other days.
Allah intends for you ease, and He does not want to make things difficult for you. (He wants that you) must complete the same number (of days), and that you must magnify Allah for having guided you so that you may be grateful to Him" (2: 185).
"It is made lawful for you to have sexual relations with your wives on the night of the fasts. They are garments for you and you are the same for them. Allah knows that you used to deceive yourselves, so He turned to you and forgave you. So now have sexual relations with them and seek that which Allah has ordained for you, and eat and drink until the white thread (light) of dawn appears to you distinct from the black thread (darkness of night), then complete your fast till the nightfall.
And do not have sexual relations with them (your wives) while you are in Itikaf in the mosques. These are the limits (set) by Allah, so approach them not. Thus does Allah make clear His signs to mankind that they may become Al Muttaqun (the pious)" (2:187).
"Verily! We have sent it (this Quran) down in the night of Al-Qadr.
And what will make you know what the night of Al-Qadr is?
The night of Al-Qadr is better than a thousand months
Therein descend the angels and the Ruh (Gabriel) by Allah's Permission with all Decrees,
Peace! until the appearance of dawn (97:1-5)
THE HADITH ON FASTING
Abu Huraira related that the Prophet (peace and blessings be upon him) said: Whoever fasts during Ramadan with faith and seeking his reward from Allah will have his past sins forgiven. Whoever prays during the nights in Ramadan with faith and seeking his reward from Allah will have his past sins forgiven. And he who passes Lailat al-Qadr in prayer with faith and seeking his reward from Allah will have his past sins forgiven (Bukhari, Muslim).
Abu Huraira related that Rasulullah said: If anyone omits his fast even for one day in Ramadan without a concession or without being ill, then if he were to fast for the rest of his life he could not make up for it (Bukhari).
Abu Huraira related that the Prophet said: Allah the Majestic and Exalted said: "Every deed of man will receive ten to 700 times reward, except Siyam (fasting), for it is for Me and I shall reward it (as I like). There are two occasions of joy for one who fasts: one when he breaks the fast and the other when he will meet his Lord" (Muslim).
Abu Huraira related that Rasulullah said: Many people who fast get nothing from their fast except hunger and thirst, and many people who pray at night get nothing from it except wakefulness (Darimi).
When to start fasting
Ibn Umar related that the Prophet said: Do not start fasting unless you see the new moon, and do not end fasting until you see it. If the weather is cloudy then calculate when it should appear (Bukhari, Muslim).
The Suhoor meal (which is eaten before dawn)
Anas related that Rasulullah said: Take the Suhoor meal, for there is blessing in it (Bukhari, Muslim).
Breaking your fast
Salman ibn Amir Dhabi related that the Prophet said: Break your fast with dates, or else with water, for it is pure (Abu Dawud, Tirmidhi).
Fasting during a journey
Aisha related that Rasulullah was asked whether one should fast when on a journey, and he replied: Fast if you like, or postpone it if you like (Bukhari, Muslim).
Behavior while fasting
Abu Huraira related that the Prophet said: If a person does not avoid false talk and false conduct during Siyam, then Allah does not care if he abstains from food and drink (Bukhari, Muslim).
Forgetfully eating or drinking while fasting
Abu Huraira related that Rasulullah said: If anyone forgets that he is fasting and eats or drinks he should complete his Siyam, for it is Allah who has fed him and given him drink (Bukhari, Muslim).
Providing for those who are breaking the fast
Zaid ibn Khalid Juhni related that the Prophet said: He who provides for the breaking of the Siyam of another person earns the same merit as the one who was observing Siyam diminishing in any way the reward of the latter (Tirmidhi).
Lailat al-Qadr
Aisha related that the Prophet said: Look for Lailat al-Qadr on an odd-numbered night during the last ten nights of Ramadan (Bukhari).
Anas ibn Malik related that Rasulullah said: When Lailat al-Qadr comes Gabriel descends with a company of angels who ask for blessings on everyone who is remembering Allah, whether they are sitting or standing (Baihaqi).

Salaam Brothers & Sisters!



Salaam Brothers & Sisters! 
Can you remember Rizana Nafeek? She is in Jail in Saudi Arabia. Every Muslim in Sri lanka should be responsible for her not only Rizana Nafeek there are many. If our Zakath is reaching properly to poor family in sri lanka there will be no Rizana Nafeek in our Sri lanka. Do you know how many Muslim people doing sin because poverty? Other hand we have big problem Dowry recent data base saying 25% our sisters age (25 to 30) not married because of dowry. Where is our scholar? Where are our Muslim Rich People? We have to give answer for all these to Allah. At least think about in this holy month Ramadan. Ask Duva for All our Umma during holy month Ramadan.     

Saturday, 30 July 2011

Ramadan Mubarak - Poetry -2011



Ramadan Poetry 2011  

      Ramadan is here, The month that is blessed;
Ramadan is here, The month we love best.
The month in which the Qur’an was sent;
A time of great blessing in which to repent.
Fasting for Allah is a great Muslim deed;
Controlling desires and Suppressing greed.
Ramadan is coming, Increase your Iman(faith).
Ramadan is coming, Recite the Qur’an.
Take “Suhur” in the dead of the Night;
No eating or drinking during the daylight.
Refrain from bad deeds and repent your soul;
The pleasure of Allah is our only goal.
Even if there is hunger, remember your Lord
And wait until ‘Iftar’ to earn your reward.
Fasting is one of the gifts of Allah
Given to believers to increase ‘Taqwah’ (piety).
We pray to Allah to put right our hearts;
Ask for forgiveness from Allah and make a new start.
Raising our hands we ask for his ‘Rahmaa’;
Hear us our Lord and grant us ‘Jannah’.

The Day I Died


-The Day I Died-^- *PROBABLY THE MOST IMPORTANT SHORT STORY YOU WILL EVER READ IN YOUR LIFE! PLEASE SHARE THIS AS WELL..
-^-The Day I Died-^- *PROBABLY THE MOST IMPORTANT SHORT STORY YOU WILL EVER READ IN YOUR LIFE! PLEASE SHARE THIS AS WELL..
by Haroon on Saturday, August 28, 2010 at 12:09pm

Day I Died
It was Halloween night. I made plans with my friends Omar and Malik to go watch SAW 3 at a nearby theatre in Santa Monica, California. We were running late and I realized that I had not prayed Isha but I didnt say anything because I did not want to upset the mood. "Ill just pray afterwards," I told myself.

I only lived 26 years. My 27th birthday was exactly two weeks away. I always imagined I would live long. At least until age 60. It just wasn't imaginable that I would have such a sudden, unexpected death.

I graduated from the University of Southern California three years earlier with a degree that means absolutely nothing right now. Shortly after, I landed a job as the marketing director of a major clothing company. Aside from the usual life problems, I was living a normal life.

My girlfriend of 4 years was starting to pressure me into us getting a place together. I knew I wasn't supposed to have a girlfriend in the first place but I enjoyed her company and friendship. I wasn't ready to give that up. I used to always tell myself that eventually I would marry her. Plus, what would these few years of living a sinful life mean by the time I got older?

My job, girlfriend and life-friends took up the majority of my time. It seemed I never had time to pray. I hardly even had time to sit down and eat. Offering prayer was always something that irritated me. I did give an effort to keep up on my prayers but for the last two years of my life I gave up. I pretty much stopped praying altogether.

I never made it home in time to pray that night. SAW 3 was a walk through the rose garden compared to what I was about to experience. I was doing 80 on the route 10 freeway. At 12 midnight, 80mph is not considered speeding. Omar flipped through FM radio stations searching for the song he liked. Malik had fallen asleep in the back seat. I began to doze off too. I used to hate when that happened. I shook out of what seemed like a 10 second snooze. I tried to keep my eyes open. But again I dozed off.

Omar screamed, "HEY!" It was too late. The car struck the center divider and spun back into the flow of traffic. An on coming car hit my door. That car was also hit by another vehicle. We finally came to a halt somewhere in the middle of the freeway, a hundred yards from the spot of the collision. I didn't feel any pain. I was just dizzy. I heard Omar and Malik moaning as good civilians tried pulling us from the wreck.

I wasn't rescued until the fire fighters arrived. It was quite a task recovering my battered body from my totalled car. Breathing became difficult. The fire fighters huddled around me and frantically applied device after device. "He's not gonna make it," I heard one of them say. I'm not gonna make it? How? I didn't feel like I was dying. I felt nothing. My heart started pounding. I was soaked in sweat and blood. I saw Malik standing over the top of me with tears in his eyes. "Don't quit on me", he told me. At that time I knew it was over. I started to cry.

The fire fighters moved him away as they made last attempts to revive me. I died. An angel came to me and removed my soul. I watched him fly away with it in disbelief. "How could you? I'm not even 27," I pleaded. "It's time," he told me and left...

Two minutes later they pulled a white sheet over me. Omar and Malik, apparently doing better than me, pulled the sheet back to look at me one last time. They cried their eyeballs out. I had known them ever since I was 13 years old and had never seen either one cry. It was a depressing sight.

The ride to the morgue, until then, was the worst experience I ever had. I was alone. It was dark and cold. I missed my mom. I missed my brother. I missed my sister. I wished I had spent that last night with my family instead of with Omar and Malik. I worried what my mother was going to do when she saw me in this state. I was ugly. When we finally arrived, I was placed in another cold room with dozens of other dead people.

I missed my family so much. Every so often a family came in to view their dead. I always thought it was my family but it wasn't. Hour after hour passed. No mom. No dad. I started to cry again. Then one odd hour I recognized voices. My father walked in with my mother in his arms. His face was worn from stress. Hers wet with tears. They just stared into my eyes and cried. I stared back. I wanted to tell them I loved them. I couldn't. I wanted to hug them. I couldn't. Mom stroked my bloodied hair and kissed my forehead. Dad held her up from collapsing. He slowly pulled her away.

I was to be buried the next day. When my parents left, it hit me. I never made Isha prayer! My heart jumped out my chest. I owed Allah a prayer and failed to deliver it to Him. I had hundreds of missed prayers over the past two years. Now I was about to face Him. I felt powerless. For those of you
who have never experienced guilt at death, there is not a worldly feeling that amounts to it. It is guilt and sorrow at another level. I tried getting up to make Isha prayer but I couldn't move. It was over. I had no second chance.

Then I began to think back. I never knew my memory was so good. I had more than enough time to ponder as I was awaiting my burial. I literally remember every single prayer I missed and reasons why I missed them. Most were laziness, procrastination and neglectfulness. I knew I was in trouble. I wished they would take longer to bury me. I failed! I failed!

My girlfriend paid me a visit. She was a devil. When I was alive I saw her as a pretty angel. My pretty angel who loved me and would do anything to make me happy. If I had the ability, I would have cursed her and demanded her to leave the morgue. She put her hand on my forehead. I allowed her to do that for the past four years. Now that I opposed to it, I could do nothing about it. The devil cried for hours at my side. She just would not leave. I felt cheated. I felt like she pulled a joke on me for the past couple of years of my life. I hated this devil! She was ugly! She smelled horrible! She finally left... As she walked out the door my heart was filled with fear and anxiety.

The funeral was simple. My body was washed. I didn't seem to care that my naked body was exposed. My worries far surpassed my desire to be modest. I was wrapped in three white sheets. About 300 people attended my funeral. I was saddened not to see my mom at the funeral. I wished she came to see me one last time before they put me in the ground. I never knew so many people cared about me. Many just stared at the tightly wrapped figure in disbelief. Others cried and cried some more.

The mass prayed for me. Thousands of individual prayers were made. They asked Allah to have mercy on me. They asked Him to forgive me. I wanted to pray for myself but I couldn't speak. I was helpless. I was carried to the hole in the middle of the barren desert. The people followed. It seemed like slow motion. I didn't want to go. If I had 24 bonus hours I would pray non-stop. They lowered me into the ground. The anticipation was eating away at me. I had surely failed life.

I thought back on everything I had worked so hard to accomplish. I earned a college degree. I had a well paying job. I spent hours and hours in the gym ever since I was 16 years old developing my body. I had a pretty girlfriend who loved me. In that life, that was a badge of honor. But as they were lowering me into this grave, which seemed like it took forever, I realized I couldn't use any of
those "accomplishments". If only I had been that dedicated to praying five times daily, I would have been at peace right now. Instead I am a nervous wreck beyond anything you all can comprehend.

Dirt fell in my hole. Darkness overcame my new home. The last shovels of sand filled the grave. Everyone sadly walked away. The graveyard started to empty. Family by family. Mine was the last to leave. I could hear their footsteps as they walked away. By nightfall it was just me. All alone. My wrapping was soaked in sweat. I nervously awaited the angels to come and question me.

They finally did. My final judgment has not been reached yet. I am now waiting for judgment day. Still lying here, alone, as day comes and night falls. Soon I will meet Allah Himself and He will decide whether He will forgive me or not. I can only lay here, wait and hope The All Forgiving, The Most Merciful forgives me and does not punish me. I hope. That is all I have right now. Hope.

THIS IS A STORY BUT THIS IS ALSO THE REALITY OF LIFE. YOU WILL DIE ONE DAY. COULD BE TOMORROW. COULD BE TODAY. FOR THE SINNERS THERE WILL BE TORTURE IN THE GRAVE. PLEASE TAKE THIS SERIOUSLY. DO NOT WASTE THIS PRECIOUS TIME WHILE YOU ARE ALIVE.

I Ask myself tonigt


I ask myself tonight!
By Sound Vision Staff Writer
"Oh how swiftly, it's mid-Ramadan now
I sit here, wondering and thinking how,
Have I spent my first days of Ramadan fruitfully?
Or have I wasted the time unknowingly?"
[...]
Ramadhan comes, for a short month it's here
Will I ever meet the Ramadan next year?
Allah Oh Allah, help me guide my heart through
For only You know, if I've devoted enough to You."
-excerpts of the poem "Not done enough this Ramadan" by Udiana Jamalludin
Ramadan, as usual, has flown by. Despite planning beforehand, many of us may have gotten caught up in a routine after accustoming ourselves to the change in schedule the blessed month brings.
This may have affected our initial plans to increase our worship, contemplation and to seek Allah's Forgiveness and Mercy with greater fervor. But the last ten days and nights of Ramadan are still ahead for us to benefit from. Ask yourself these questions and see what you can do to make the most of what's left of Ramadan this year, Insha Allah.
1. Have I kept pace with the amount of Quran I wanted to read, or have I fallen behind?
2. If so, how much do I have to read on a daily basis the rest of Ramadan to catch up?
3. Have I tried to attend Tarawih regularly, or did I use weak excuses to get out of it?
4. Did I ever pray the night prayer?
5. Did I try praying my five daily prayers with more sincerity, concentration, and focus than usual?
6. Did I invite anyone over for Iftar (breaking the fast)?
7. Did I help any needy person, even a panhandler or beggar, when I was fasting?
8. Did I regularly seek Allah's Forgiveness and Mercy with sincerity, fear and hope?
9. Did I encourage my family to fast or participate in regular opportunities for more rewards that come with Ramadan (i.e. good deeds in general, but also Tarawih, more reading of the Quran, etc.).
10. Did I memorize any more Quran than what I knew before Ramadan started?
11. Did I try to be more patient in Ramadan than I normally am?
12. Did I try to control my anger, especially while fasting?
13. Did I try harder to avoid backbiting and slander?
14. Did I constantly check my intentions, to make sure that my good deeds were for the sake of Allah alone, not to impress others, gain their favor, or to show off?
15. Was there even an atom of pride in my heart?
16. Was I quieter and more contemplative?
17. Did I cry in my prayers?
18. Did I read more Islamic literature apart from the Quran?
19. Did I make sincere repentance to Allah, really feeling sorry for my sins?
20. Did I forgive those who hurt me?
21. Did I avoid hurting anyone with my attitude, words, intentions or actions?
22. Did I give any more Sadaqah (charity) than I normally give?
23. Did I share the message of Ramadan and Islam with a non-Muslim?
24. Did I share the message of Ramadan and Islam with a non-practicing Muslim family member or friend?
25. Did I feel annoyed at being hungry while fasting or did I rejoice?

Friday, 29 July 2011

Beautiful message!!




Beautiful message!!

 THIS IS HOW WE MISS OUT SOMETHING CALLED "LIFE"
 
 A boy was born to a couple after eleven years of marriage.
 They were a  loving couple and the boy was the gem of their eyes.
 When  the boy was around  two years old, one morning the husband saw a medicine   bottle  open.
 He was  late for office so he asked his wife to cap the bottle and  keep it in the  cupboard.
 His wife, preoccupied in the kitchen totally  forgot the matter. 
 The boy saw the bottle and playfully went to the  bottle  fascinated by its color and drank it all.
 It happened to be  a poisonous  medicine meant for adults in small dosages.
 When the child  collapsed the  mother hurried him to the hospital, where he died. 
 The  mother was stunned.  She was terrified how to face her husband. 
 When the  distraught father came  to the hospital and saw the dead child, he looked at his
 wife and uttered  just 5 words. 
  
 QUESTIONS
 1. What were the five words?
 2. What is the implication of this story?
  
ANSWER
The husband just said "I am with you Darling"

  
 The husband's totally unexpected reaction is a  proactive behavior.
 The  child is dead. He can never be brought back to life.
 There  is no point  in finding fault with the mother.
 Besides, if only he had  taken time to  keep the bottle away, this would not have happened. 
 No one  is to be blamed.
 She had also lost her only child.
 
 What she needed at that moment was consolation and sympathy from the husband.
 That is what he gave her. 
  
 If everyone can look at life with this kind of perspective,
 there would  be much fewer problems in the world. 
"A journey of a  thousand miles  begins with a single step".
 Take off all your envies,  jealousies, unforgiveness,  selfishness, and fears.
 And you will find things are  actually not as difficult as you think.
 
 MORAL OF THE STORY

 This story is really worth reading. .... Sometimes we spend
 time in asking  who is responsible or whom to blame, whether in a
 relationship, in a job  or with the people we know.
  
Add caption

 By this way we miss out something called L.I.F.E.. 

Rude Behavior

Rude Behavior

Islam is the religion of peace where everyone has to be gentle towards others. The morality of islam tells us to be kind, just and nice in attitude and behavior. While speaking we should be gentle and kind similarly, our attitude when we are quiet should not be like those of proud people. In short, muslims are told to be kind and gentle and not rude and proud like those of kufars.


Our beloved prophet Muhammad s.a.w.w never talked rude to any one, be it His enemy, even. Being followers of that great personality, we should also behave the same i.e kind and nice.

ALLAH swt said in Quran about those who were disbelievers and rude;

Al-Quran 71:007
“In fact, whenever I call them (to say) that You might forgive them, they stick their fingers in their ears. They (hide their faces and) wrap their clothes around them (in defiance). They grew obstinate and became (rude and insulting, and) increasingly arrogant.”

So, in this verse of Quran the traits of arrogant people are discussed who become rude when it comes to listen to others. The one who is humble is always a good listener. We may disagree on any matter with our brothers and sisters, but what we should not forget is the behavior of a good muslim.

ALLAH swt says in Quran: 41:34
 "And O prophet :goodness and evil are not equal.Repel evil with what is best. You will see that, he with whom you had enemity, has become your closest friend."

This verse gives us a very beautiful lesson to be soft and genetle towards even those who are not good to us. when we work on thr formulaof “tit for tat” we take revenge but we make that person our enemy forever. This is what we can see as a practice in some tribes who are still present in some pasrts of world. They are enemies of each other from egenrations. Instead of forgiving, these people like to grow in enemity.

In another verse of Quran, ALLAh swt says that the one who is rude and harsh, cannot make the people around him understand even his valid points. Such a person is never liked and he can never leave a good impression on the people he live with.

AL-Quran 3:159
“It was by a sort of mercy from God thou didst deal gently with them, for hadst thou been rough and rude of heart they had dispersed from around thee. But pardon them, and ask forgiveness for them, and take counsel with them in the affair. As for what thou hast resolved, rely upon God; verily, God loves those who do rely.”
There are several ahadith that deal with how Muhammad s.a.w.w dealt with even those who become harsh with HIM, one of them is given below;

Bukhari Volume 3, Book 38, Number 502:
Narrated Abu Huraira: A man came to the Prophet demanding his debts and behaved rudely. The companions of the Prophet intended to harm him, but Allah's Apostle said (to them), "Leave him, for the creditor (i.e. owner of a right) has the right to speak." Allah's Apostle then said, "Give him a camel of the same age as that of his." The people said, "O Allah's Apostle! There is only a camel that is older than his." Allah's Apostle said, "Give (it to) him, for the best amongst you is he who pays the rights of others handsomely."

This is how our beloved prophet s.a.w.w dealt with a man who spoke to Him harshly, ask yourself, if you can be this genetle and nice towards even your friends?

Prophet Muhammad s.a.w.w told us the traits of hypocrite in the following hadith;

Bukhari Volume 1, Book 2, Number 33:

Narrated 'Abdullah bin 'Amr: The Prophet said, "Whoever has the following four (characteristics) will be a pure hypocrite and whoever has one of the following four characteristics will have one characteristic of hypocrisy unless and until he gives it up.

1. Whenever he is entrusted, he betrays.
2. Whenever he speaks, he tells a lie.
3. Whenever he makes a covenant, he proves treacherous.
4. Whenever he quarrels, he behaves in a very imprudent, evil and insulting manner."

To sum up, we should take care of our speech and we should not  be arrogant neither in our talk nor in our behavior.

Training Kids For Ramadan

Training Kids For Ramadan

After namaz, the third pillar of islam is roza i.e. fasting. A muslim cannot be a muslim if he does not believes or cares for the five major pillars of islam. The belief of a person develops in his early age. If a child is not told what his belief is, he will wander around and there is a possibility that that kid go astray. So this is the prime duty of parents to keep their kids on the right path.


At the age of seven, namaz becomes compulsory on the kid and at age of 10 parents can beat their kid if he does not care for namaz. Roza is fard at age of puberty. As soon as kids reach their age of puberty, they are entitled to observe fast.

Why is it made compulsory at young age? The reason is, since at the early age, children learn fast and they understand easily, at the later age, people are more ego struck and to exercise religion becomes difficult for them. How to tell you kid and prepare him for Ramadan? There are few pointsc to be taken into account.

1: before asking your kid to fast at his proper age, make him understand the reason why we fast. Tell him how good it is to fast.

2: kids are curious to know each and every thing, they ask questions, so be patient to them, and while telling them about Ramadan, learn authentic and good knowledge.

3: tell them at their younger age to observe little fasts with you, in this way they will be abel to learn how to fast and how mom and dad fast.

4: do not discourage your kids if they ask to fast with you. Let them observe and if in the middle of the day, they cannot make it through, do not enforce them to wait for the aftar.

5: make sure that kids wake up at sahar and they are present at aftar. Given them equal importance and deal with them gently so that they also feel urge to fast.

6: tell them to be good kids while having fast. In this way kids will learn to be good and to avoid bad things in Ramadan.

Prepare your kids for Ramadan so that when roza becomes obligatory, they do ntohave any trouble observing fast.

How a Muslim Should Walk On Earth?

How a Muslim Should Walk On Earth?

Human being has been created from dust and given a shape of the crown of creatures by ALLAH swt. The very existence of humans should be enough for all of us to surrender our will to ALLAH swt. But then out of pride and forgetting ALLAH has made many humans a lesson for the coming generations. Pharaohs claimed divinity and proudly rejected ALLAH swt, they are even today shown as a lesson to us.


Various nations felt proud for their evil practices and rejected ALLAH’s message, they were ruined and their ruined cities are even today present for lesson taking. Jews felt proud and they were made cursed. And there are many other examples around us to understand.

ALLAH swt says at many places in Quran to abstain from pride and to be humble.

Al Quran 17:037

“And do not walk on the earth arrogantly. You will neither wear down the earth, nor match the stature of the mountains.”

What does a man get when he walks proudly on earth? Nothing! The only thing a man can do by walking arrogantly on earth is to earn the anger of ALLAH swt. Just see how much ALLAH swt gives us either we ask or do not ask for our desires. When ALLAH is so kind towards us why should we be proud being HIS creation at first place?

Al Quran 31:018

“Do not talk to people contemptuously, nor walk insolently on the earth. Surely, Allah does not like a haughty braggart.”

Since we are only creation who cannot live without ALLAH’s will, we should be least concerned with our desires of fame and pride, and we should be only concerned with our purpose of creation to make the life lived justly. What should be our behavior if we want to live on earth like true slaves of ALLAH swt;

Al-Quran 31:019

“Rather, be modest when you walk and keep your voice subdued when you talk. Indeed, the harshest of all voices is that of a donkey.”

The more modest we try to be, the more we are able to shun the pride and arrogance from ourselves. This is what a true muslim should do, and he ultimately achieves.

Prophet Muhammad s.a.w.w also disliked pride and anything that can lead to self pride which only ruins life as well as the hereafter.

Bukhari, Volume 9, Book 93, Number 550:

Narrated Abu Musa: A man came to the Prophet and said, "A man fights for pride and haughtiness another fights for bravery, and another fights for showing off; which of these (cases) is in Allah's Cause?" The Prophet said, "The one who fights that Allah's Word (Islam) should be superior, fights in Allah's Cause." (See Hadith No. 65, Vol. 4)

This hadith is self explanatory and it totally rejects those fights that are fought for pride between families or between nations. Because the winner will walk on earth as if there is no one above him and the loser tries to humiliate the winner and tries to level the battle by snatching the title.

Bukhair, Volume 5, Book 57, Number 17:

Narrated Abdullah bin Umar:
That Allah's Apostle said, "Allah will not look on the Day of Judgment at him who drags his robe (behind him) out of pride." Abu Bakr said "One side of my robe slacks down unless I get very cautious about it." Allah's Apostle said, "But you do not do that with a pride."

Therefore, pride and arrogance are for the jahiliyah not for the muslims. We cannot wage war against ALLAH swt and His Messenger s.a.w.w instead we should strive to be good muslims so that when we go to our real place i.e. the day of judgment we could be happy by living with the righteous people in jannah.

Offering Tahajjud In Light of Quran and Hadith

Offering Tahajjud In Light of Quran and Hadith

Tahajjud namaz is the most valuable among the involuntary namaz which is offered during anytime in the day. though this namaz is not compulsory yet it offers great deal of sawab as well as pleasure of ALLAH swt. what is the significance of offering tahajjud and what are the blessing associated with it are given below.


Al Quran 51: 17-18

They used to sleep but little in the night. And in the early part of the morning they asked forgiveness.

A- Quran 25: 63-64
"The slaves of the Beneficent are they who walk upon the earth in humbleness, and when the ignorant address them, they say: 'Peace' and they who spend the night prostrating before their Lord and standing"
In the above verses of Holy Quran, ALLAH swt has described characteristic of the good people that they care to spend a part of their night to worship ALLAH swt so that they can take the advantage of peace and loneliness of night to worship ALLAH and to invoke Him for the forgiveness.

In another holy verse ALLAH swt says that by worshiping Him at the late hours can raise our status to a position of great glory i.e. we can get the pleasure of ALLAH and be good and pious servants of ALLAH swt.
AL-Quran 17:79
And during a part of the night, pray Tahajjud beyond what is incumbent on you; maybe your Rabb will raise you to a position of great glory.

 ALLAH’s messenger Muhammad s.a.w.w said: (Bukhari :: Book 4 :: Volume 54 :: Hadith 491)

Narrated Abu Huraira: Allah's Apostle said:

"During your sleep, Satan knots three knots at the back of the head of each of you, and he breathes the following words at each knot, 'The night is, long, so keep on sleeping,' If that person wakes up and celebrates the praises of Allah, then one knot is undone, and when he performs ablution the second knot is undone, and when he prays, all the knot are undone, and he gets up in the morning lively and gay, otherwise he gets up dull and gloomy. "

Thus, the satan’s defeat is the worship of a momin. We should be more than concerned to win from satan which invokes our nafs to spend time in useless activities but to avoid and abstain from worship as much as we can.

Tahajjud is the most excellent prayer after the obligatory prayers. It has also been described as a way to seek ALLAH’s pleasure as the above quoted verses suggest.

Reported by Muslim, Abu Daawood, at-Tirmidhee
Abu Hurairah (radiallaahu anhu) said:  The Messenger of Allaah (sallallaahu alaihi wasallam) said: The most excellent fasting after the month of Ramadan is fasting during the month of Allaah, Muharram, and the most excellent prayer after the obligatory prayers is the night prayer.

Offering tahajjud is act of worship that not everyone does and this is the reason it offers great deal of  reward. The One who prays at night obtains a reward which most of mankind do not. below are given some ahadith which throw light on the significance of mid-night namaz.

Reported by Muslim, Abu Daawood, at-Tirmidhee.

Abdullaah bin Amr (radiallaahu anhu) said: The Prophet (sallallaahu alaihi wasallam) said: “In Paradise there is a home whose outside can be seen from the inside and whose inside can be seen from the outside.” Abu Maalik al- Ash’aree said: Who is this for O Messenger of Allaah? He said: “It is for the one who makes his speech good and decent, who feeds others and spends the night in standing whilst others are sleeping.”

Reported by Bukhaaree, Muslim and others.

Mugheerah ibn Shu’bah (radiallaahu anhu) said:  The Prophet (sallallaahu alaihi wasallam) stood until his feet became swollen. It was said to him: Has not Allaah forgiven all your sins, those past and those in the future? He (sallallaahu alaihi wasallam) replied:“Should I not be a grateful servant?”

Reported by Muslim
Jaabir (radiallaahu anhu) said: I heard the Messenger of Allaah (sallallaahu alaihi wasallam) say: “Indeed, there is an hour during the night, no muslim asks Allaah for any good from among the affairs of the world or the Hereafter during it except that Allaah gives the very same to him, and this is every night.”

Reported by Muslim
Abdullaah bin Amr (radiallaahu anhu) said: The Messenger of Allaah (sallallaahu alaihi wasallam) said: “There is no jealousy except towards two: A man to whom Allaah has given the Qur’aan, so he stands (in prayer) with it during the night and during the day and a man to whom Allaah has given wealth so he spends it during the night and during the day.

(Reported by al-Bukhaari, al-Fath, no. 940).
The best way to perform the night prayer is to pray two by two (rak'ahs), and to separate the two even rak'ahs of witr from the one rak'ah (i.e., not to join the three rak'ahs of witr). The evidence for this is the hadeeth of Ibn 'Umar (may Allaah be pleased with them both), who said: "The Prophet (Peace & Blessings of Allah be upon Him) used to perform the night prayers two by two (rak'ahs), then he would end with a single rak'ah."

(Reported by Abu Daawood)
Abu Hurairah (radiallaahu anhu) said: The Messenger of Allaah (sallallaahu alaihi wasallam) said: “May Allaah show mercy to a man who got up during the night and prayed and then woke his wife and if she refused, sprinkled water over her face and may Allaah show mercy to a woman who got up during the night and prayed and then woke up her husband and if he refused sprinkled water over his face.”

(Reported by an-Nasaaee, Ibn Maajah)
Abu Hurairah (radiallaahu anhu) and Abu Sa ’eed (radiallaahu anhu) both report that the Messenger of Allaah (sallallaahu alaihi wasallam) said: “When a man wakes up his wife during the night and they both pray, or they pray two rakahs together, they are written amongst the men who remember Allaah often and the women who remember Allaah often.”

Ramadan Is Not Just Eating and Sleeping

Ramadan Is Not Just Eating and Sleeping

The blessings of Ramadan are many folds the goodness of this month cannot be measured with any scale because this is the month of ALLAH swt. These 29/30 days are so much that we can make lifetime in these days if we worship and invoke ALLAH sincerely. Ramadan’s blessings and ahadith and verses are quoted and known to almost everyone around us, but the true spirit of Ramadan is ruined by the new trends set by people.


Just look around you and observe how people spend Ramadan, they know there will be no satan and they will be save from sins but then they also do nto care to do any good deeds if they avoid bad deeds. Ramadan should not be observed only in words, but it should be given importance in real. Eating as much as one can in the sahar and then to eat as much as one can in the aftar is not fasting. Neither all day sleep will serve any purpose or will do any good.

To eat in sahar and then to sleep without offering namaz or reciting Quran means nothing. And to eat in aftar and miss the prayer of maghrib. Often people get so tired from eating that they again sleep and miss even their isha. They seldom offer taraweeh. Is Ramadan name of eating and fulfilling our craze of having different verity of dishes on table?

No, Ramadan does not mean to spend money on eatables; it means to earn this one month in real, in spirit. But no one cares to earn the month rather they like to earn the maximum taste.

Why does one sleeps all the day while fasting? Fasting means to feel the hunger so that we can feel the pain fo those who do not have enough to eat, fasting means to surrender our will to ALLAH swt by feeling the importance of rizq that we are given thrice a day or more than that, fasting means to understand that how our beloved Prophet s.a.ww. and his companions fought without having anything to eat, but a sleeping man cannot understand and feel all this.

A sleeping man will certainly pass the time but his purpose of fasting will be lost, and he will never be able to understand the reason of fasting, the purpose of fasting and the peace which soul feels during fast.
Let us be more concerned with finding our purpose of living by fasting in real spirit rather than passing time. Let us make ourselves muslims, the real muslims this Ramadan by worshiping and by feeling the fast and realizing how many blessings we receive every day.

I ask myself tonight!


I ask myself tonight!

By Sound Vision Staff Writer
"Oh how swiftly, it's mid-Ramadan now
I sit here, wondering and thinking how,
Have I spent my first days of Ramadan fruitfully?
Or have I wasted the time unknowingly?"

[...]

Ramadhan comes, for a short month it's here

Will I ever meet the Ramadan next year?
Allah Oh Allah, help me guide my heart through
For only You know, if I've devoted enough to You."
-excerpts of the poem "Not done enough this Ramadan" by Udiana Jamalludin
Ramadan, as usual, has flown by. Despite planning beforehand, many of us may have gotten caught up in a routine after accustoming ourselves to the change in schedule the blessed month brings.
This may have affected our initial plans to increase our worship, contemplation and to seek Allah's Forgiveness and Mercy with greater fervor. But the last ten days and nights of Ramadan are still ahead for us to benefit from. Ask yourself these questions and see what you can do to make the most of what's left of Ramadan this year, Insha Allah.
1. Have I kept pace with the amount of Quran I wanted to read, or have I fallen behind?
2. If so, how much do I have to read on a daily basis the rest of Ramadan to catch up?
3. Have I tried to attend Tarawih regularly, or did I use weak excuses to get out of it?
4. Did I ever pray the night prayer?
5. Did I try praying my five daily prayers with more sincerity, concentration, and focus than usual?
6. Did I invite anyone over for Iftar (breaking the fast)?
7. Did I help any needy person, even a panhandler or beggar, when I was fasting?
8. Did I regularly seek Allah's Forgiveness and Mercy with sincerity, fear and hope?
9. Did I encourage my family to fast or participate in regular opportunities for more rewards that come with Ramadan (i.e. good deeds in general, but also Tarawih, more reading of the Quran, etc.).
10. Did I memorize any more Quran than what I knew before Ramadan started?
11. Did I try to be more patient in Ramadan than I normally am?
12. Did I try to control my anger, especially while fasting?
13. Did I try harder to avoid backbiting and slander?
14. Did I constantly check my intentions, to make sure that my good deeds were for the sake of Allah alone, not to impress others, gain their favor, or to show off?
15. Was there even an atom of pride in my heart?
16. Was I quieter and more contemplative?
17. Did I cry in my prayers?
18. Did I read more Islamic literature apart from the Quran?
19. Did I make sincere repentance to Allah, really feeling sorry for my sins?
20. Did I forgive those who hurt me?
21. Did I avoid hurting anyone with my attitude, words, intentions or actions?
22. Did I give any more Sadaqah (charity) than I normally give?
23. Did I share the message of Ramadan and Islam with a non-Muslim?
24. Did I share the message of Ramadan and Islam with a non-practicing Muslim family member or friend?
25. Did I feel annoyed at being hungry while fasting or did I rejoice?

Monday, 25 July 2011

10 great goals to set for this Ramadan

10 great goals to set for this Ramadan

  1. Eat, drink and be moderate
Almost all of us do it - once Iftar time hits, we just keep plowing food and drink into our mouths till it's hard to move afterwards. And those of us who do it know this is totally contrary to the spirit of Ramadan, through which we're supposed to learn self-control not self-indulgence. Let's try to stick to the Prophetic rule on eating: fill our stomachs with one-third food, one-third water and one-third breathing space, even in Ramadan.
  1. Give a dollar a day in charity...or five or ten
The Prophet Muhammad, peace and blessings be upon him, was always generous but even more so in Ramadan. Let's open our hearts and dig a little deeper in our wallets this year. Even less than a dollar a day adds up. Whatever you can give, it's the intention that counts.
  1. Memorize 4 new Surahs
Memorizing the Quran often seems like a daunting task. But the key is doing it in small bites. Since there are four weeks in Ramadan, try to memorize one new Surah a week. Start off with a short, easy one. Once you've started, you'll build momentum and may even want to memorize a longer one the following week.
  1. Go to Tarawih prayers
Post-Iftar, the first urge is to sleep after an exhausting day. But try your best to head out to the mosque for Tarawih prayers. Praying alone is wonderful, but doing it in congregation is fantastic. The community spirit is part of Ramadan's blessings. Don't miss it this year. If going every day is not possible, try going at least one week.
  1. Attend the Tarawih prayer in which the recitation of the Quran will be finished
Call the local mosque and find out which day the Imam will be finishing the recitation of the Quran in prayer. Attend to not only hear part of the Quran's recitation in prayer, but also participate in the heart-rending Duas that follow it.
  1. Stop swearing and/or backbiting – with a special box
It's hard not to shoot our mouths off when someone's upset us. Whether we utter those four-letter words or backbite about someone to our family and friends, we know this isn't the God-approved way of letting off steam. In Ramadan, when we want to build our spirituality, we've got to wage Jihad against our bad habits.
Try this: get a box and every time you catch yourself swearing or backbiting put some money in it. It could be a buck or less. The point is to choose an amount that makes it feel like punishment.
At the end of the month send the money to a charity or buy a gift for the person whom you've backbitten the most against.
  1. Call/email your relatives
You'd think that given the easy access to email, competitive long-distance calling rates, phone cards, etc. these days, we'd keep in touch with family and friends more often. But the opposite seems to be the case, as we get caught up in life's "busyness."
Strengthening ties with family members and keeping in touch with friends is part of our way of life and an act Allah is very pleased with. This Ramadan, call family and friends or at least email them a Ramadan card and ask them how their fasting is going.
  1. Go on a technology diet
Even if you work in the IT industry, you can do this. Avoid checking personal email and surfing the web during your fast. After Iftar, instead of plopping yourself in front of the screen, go to Tarawih. The same goes for the television. The point is to try to give our full attention to spiritual elevation this month.
  1. Read 5 minutes of Quran a day...just five, not more, not less
Even if you feel you've got absolutely no time, set a timer or the alarm on your cell phone and find a relatively quiet place. You can read the first page of the Quran you open or follow a sequence. The choice is yours. The point is simply to connect with God through His revelation in the month of the Quran.
  1. Forgive everyone who has hurt you
Still got a festering wound from the fight with your friend last year? Still upset about something your spouse said during a heated argument? Or are you still bitter about the way your parents sometimes treated you as a kid? Let go of the anger and pain this Ramadan and forgive those who have hurt you. Forgiving someone is not only good for the body, but it's also great for the soul. And in Ramadan, ten days of which are devoted to Allah's forgiveness, shouldn't we lesser beings forgive too?
If you find it very difficult to forgive everyone, forgive at least three people.

Your Body and Your Neighbor in Ramadan


Your Body and Your Neighbor in Ramadan

By Samana Siddiqui




Before you bite into that tasty Iftar morsel this Ramadan, remember Zachary Abdul Rahman.
 The single father of five “went from middle class to poverty in just three months,” noted the Chicago Tribune in a special reportentitled “Our Hidden Poor” in December 2007.  “I’ve literally worn the same clothes over a period of years. If it fits, I’ll keep wearing it. That lets me get them clothes and uniforms for school,” he told the newspaper. Four of his five children attended an Islamic school at the Rockford Islamic Center in Illinois when the article was written, and it was there that he slept during the day after becoming homeless the fall of that year. In the evenings, he would leave for his job on the assembly line for a Chrysler parts supplier, while his children slept at a babysitter’s house.
 Abdul Rahman had started off in Atlanta, working in computer-aided design for a fast-food restaurant. But once this temporary work ended and the project fell through, he lost his job. That was what made him move to Rockford, his childhood home, in search of support from family and work.
 It’s become a cliché to talk about the incredible indulgence we allow ourselves in Ramadan, particularly with food. The irony of fasting all day, claiming to empathize with the hungry, then overeating during Iftar. The dollars spent on lavish fast-breaking spreads, the calories consumed, the sheer indulgence of it all.
 It’s an  indulgence that affects our relationship with Allah, our bodies, and our neighbors.
 The consumption of artery-clogging, heartburn-inducing fried foods, syrup-dripping desserts, with few healthy alternatives translates into post-Iftar sluggishness, not to mention high cholesterol and a recipe for a future heart attack. This leads to difficulty performing Taraweeh prayers. Ever caught yourself falling asleep during these special acts of worship? Consider what you’ve consumed when breaking your fast that evening and you will most likely find it was far from healthy or eaten in moderation.
 Prophet Muhammad, peace and blessings be upon him, said: "No human ever filled a vessel worse than the stomach. Sufficient for any son of Adam are some morsels to keep his back straight. But if it must be, then one third for his food, one third for his drink and one third for his breath." (Ahmad, Tirmidhi, Nasai, Ibn Maajah).
 Imam Shafii’, one of Islam’s greatest scholars, reportedly saidthat "I have not filled myself in sixteen years because filling oneself makes the body heavy, removes clear understanding, induces sleep and makes one weak for worship."
 Training our bodies to worship God, which is the very purpose of our existence (Quran 51:56), means trying to avoid those things that take us away from it. This includes overeating during and outside of Ramadan.
 But how does the indulgence affect our neighbors? Going back to Zachary Abdul Rahman, perhaps we can feel a sense of shame knowing that a father in our country, perhaps even our state, city or neighborhood, is struggling to keep his family afloat while just miles away, we spend abundantly to fill our stomachs with what is neither necessary, nor healthy.
 We have truly lost the spirit of Ramadan if we ignore the fact that one in six children in the United States do not know where their next meal is coming from, while we sit counting the minutes, watching the clock to know when we can finally break our fast.
 Alhamdu lillah, Abdul Rahman’s story ended on a hopeful note: by the end of that year, he had married a Muslim woman in Michigan and was able to move himself and his children into her home in Grand Rapids. He was pursuing a degree in computer systems and looking for a new factory job. His hard work, dedication,  and optimism paid off. But in an economy where eight million jobs have been lostin the last two years, there is little guarantee of stable employment for most people. Like Abdul Rahman, how many will spiral into a descent of poverty, homelessness and want in a span of just weeks?
 So this Ramadan, let us all remember Brother Zachary, not just to fulfill our Islamic duty to those in need, but to remember our duty to our bodies and to our neighbors.

Eating dollar a day meals this Ramadan

Ramadan

Eating dollar a day meals this Ramadan

By Abdul Malik Mujahid




Over one billion people worldwide live on $1 a day. And that includes everything not just food.
To put it in practical Ramadan terms, there are Muslims around the world who survive on an Iftar and Suhoor meals that are simple, inexpensive, and limited.
Those of us blessed to enjoy a table full of a variety of foods when we break our fasts perhaps don’t consider this. Maybe we feel entitled to eat our fill. But for many, this is clearly not an option.
A good number of them are probably Muslim Americans. I heard Dr. Mehmood Khan, PepsiCo's Chief Scientific Officer, say that while there is so much hunger in the world, 20 percent of the world population I obese. In the United States, the statistics say that we have 40,000,000 obese people. (I intentionally spelled out the 40 million so it does look as big as it is.)
;This Ramadan I invite you to take the dollar a day Ramadan challenge. I have done it for the last couple of years and count it as a true blessing of Ramadan. The idea is simple. You reduce the food and drink consumption at Suhoor and Iftar times to one dollar.
Trust me, it’s not a big deal. If you can do it as a family whatever you can save can go to fight hunger in your neighborhood and across the world.
If you cannot commit to a month try it for a week or at least a weekend during this blessed month. Remember that this is a time in which we are expected to experience hunger, give charity so that we are grateful to God, and have better character, key goals of Ramadan.
I found it was not hard at all. It is not a starvation diet. There is a plenty you can eat within a dollar a day fast. I did not lose more than ten pounds during the month.
Ramadan, in which we are supposed to experience hunger to achieve a better connection with God’s Creation and with the Creator Himself, somehow has become a marathon feast. It is self-defeating. Those who cook are overburdened and do not have enough energy left for extra worship recommended for Ramadan. There is no Hadith about feasting at Iftar. There is no Sunnah of food celebrations and special cooking at Iftar throughout the life of the Prophet Muhammad, peace and blessings be upon him, and his Companions. May Allah be pleased with all of them. The feast actually is supposed to be Eid at the end of Ramadan not at the end of each day of fasting.
The Prophet, who encouraged us to fill only one-third of our stomachs even on normal days, ate far less in Ramadan.
Do a family Shura (consultation) before Ramadan and develop a menu of simplicity. Reduce the burden of cooking and divide it up across all family members.

Suhoor Options

  • I have eaten quarter to half a flat bread…
    • with a couple of dates and water and felt it was good enough
    • or dipped the bread in leftover curry from the night before
    • once in a while I have take half a bread with a fried egg
  • I have eaten half a cup of oatmeal…
    • prepared with a little milk
    • or prepared it with water on which I poured some left over curry
    • or some fruit like an orange or an apple
  • I have eaten a small portion of anything left over from the previous night
  •  At times I have just taken one banana just taken one banana
All of the above, if done at home, is around half a dollar. If I was invited to an Iftar party, I would reduce my Suhoor to just one date and water so my Iftar could be little more.
Please don’t skip Suhoor. The Prophet, peace and blessings of God be upon him, asked us not to skip it. Eat just a little as he did and as simply as he did. Allahumma Salle Ala Muhammad.

Iftar Eating

Iftar is not supposed to be a feast. Don’t divide up Iftar into snack followed by an evening meal. Just stick to one eating session. If you prefer to pray as soon as the time comes, break your fast with one date or water only, and after prayer sit down for the rest.
 It is important to achieve a variety while maintaining simplicity at the Iftar table. Try to limit it to just one main dish per evening. Or maybe just have a various snacks instead of a main dish once a week.
 I have done the following for Iftar
  •  Just taking a tablespoon or two of whatever is being served
  • The more variety the less portion you take
  • If I have not taken a date in the morning, I will take one in the evening
  • I will take half to one piece of whole wheat flat bread or a couple of scoops of rice
    • with two tablespoons of any vegetable or curry on the table.
    • if there are more than two types of dishes on the table, I would just take one spoon each
  • For drinks, avoid those bottles. They break your dollar a day budget just by themselves. Maybe a small glass of milk, homemade lemonade or for Pakistanis who want to ardently maintain their Ramadan tradition, Rooh Afza  

Iftar party eating

Iftar parties have become an important part of Muslim culture, which unfortunately encourages the following
  •  Too much food
  • Too much preparation time
  • Insisting that guests eat more by almost harassing them
  • Overeating
  • Wastage of food since no food rescue programs are organized
 The Prophet encouraged us to invite each other for Iftar and he was a generous man. He was not always poor. Initially he was married to the richest lady of Makkah and in the later part of his life, he had enough wealth to sacrifice as much as 70-plus camels during his last Hajj. But he chose to live simply and eat less.
 An Iftar party must not defy the Prophet and the spirit of Ramadan.
 Here is what I have done in Iftar parties to stick to my dollar a day diet:
  • Be the last in the line to take food. It will allow more time to socialize without food. It would bring time for Isha closer so there will be no time left for the host to insist on seconds.
  • Take half of what you plan to eat. So when hosts insist on you taking more, you have room left for it.
  • Make Ramadan and fasting a topic of the table instead of the usual useless discussions. There is nothing wrong in discussing the Prophet’s lifestyle and simple eating habits. There is nothing wrong with talking about hunger and how 15 million Muslim refugees live.

 Eating less while traveling

Initially I found I had most difficulty eating under a dollar while traveling. You cannot demand at the Secretary of State’s Iftar dinner or some other important official evening to be served such a small amount of food. Nor can you easily find very low cost restaurants. So initially, I accepted eating as little as possible in these types of situations which resulted in me probably violating my dollar a day meal plans for about seven eight times a Ramadan.
 However, I eventually found a very delicious solution. I started visiting local grocery stores while traveling to a city and buying a few items:
  • Some bread
  • A small amount of grapes
  • or 50 cents worth of peanuts
  • or other fresh produce which would last me for a couple of days during the trip
 I was surprised to see how much variety I was able to find to stick to my dollar a day Ramadan. Now when it is not Ramadan, I enjoy doing this. On a recent trip to Switzerland, that is all I did for three days and enjoyed every bit of it, or shall I say every bite of it.

 Some More Tips

 1. Skip the meat
 Meat, in most cases, is more expensive than other foods. Cutting it out of a meal is a surefire way of cutting costs. Limiting meat consumption is also considered healthier. If you cannot completely eliminate it due to what is available on the dining table, just take a small piece or limit yourself to the gravy around the meat.
 2. Skip eating out or ready to eat meals
 Hardly anything comes cheap in this category. So avoid it completely. It is not very healthy anyway.
 3. Eat more fruits and vegetables
 These are not only necessary to maintain optimum health, they are also less expensive than meat and other processed or packaged foods. Although I rarely eat canned food, don’t shun frozen fruits and vegetables. These are often cheaper while retaining health and flavor. Look up this dollar a day healthy food guide by WebMD.
4. Eat beans and lentils
 And here, you’ve got a great amount of variety. From the garbanzos familiar to lovers of Hummus to black eyed beans, you can experiment and find your favorite for a tasty, protein-rich, low-cost meal.
 5. Yummy yogurt
 Yogurt is inexpensive but offers you great taste and calcium either by itself, as a spread or added to some fruit to make a smoothie. But buying ready-made yogurt could be costly. Try making your own.
 6. Water, water, water
 The Prophet’s drink of choice when breaking his fast was water. Not even milk, which he loved. This is not only free, but it’s an alternative that replenishes what your body needs most to survive after a long day of fasting.
 7. Skip the Shawarma
 …and opt for nuts of all kinds for your protein intake, as well as eggs every other Iftar.
 8. Add inexpensive pasta, rice, and/or noodles
 This helps round out a meal and gives you some carbohydrates.
 9. Make food from scratch
 Processed foods, frozen dinners, and other convenience foods are costly and very often not healthy. Cooking from scratch does not have to be difficult or intimidating. It’s one of the best ways to save money and maintain your health.

Do it for the right reason

I was fasting with a dollar a day food very silently. But those close to me who knew about it encouraged me to share this with others.
 Our intentions should be two-fold with the dollar a day Ramadan:
  • Pleasing our Lord by following His Prophet’s path of sharing more and consuming less through simple living
  • Developing a higher level of connectedness with those more than a billion human beings who go to sleep hungry most nights.
 A conservative South Asian scholar, Ashraf Ali Thanvi, once said you must become a good human being before you can ever become a good Muslim.
 Ramadan can help us become better Muslims to fulfill the twin tests of faith given by God in the Quran. These require a better connection to service to God’s Creation and a better connection with the Creator through worship:
 Have you ever seen a human being who contradicts the essence of faith? That is the person who pushes the orphan aside and does not promote feeding the needy.

Woe, then, unto those who pray, but their hearts and minds are remote from the essence of their prayers, those who want but to be seen and praised, whereas they refuse to help others who need help. (Meaning of the Quran 107:1-7)
 May Allah give us life to see Ramadan and use it as a month-long exercise in simple living, consuming less and sharing more as the Prophet did. Ameen.